FIAN's Vision...

Children in South Africa

is a world free from hunger, in which every woman, man and child can fully enjoy their human rights in dignity, particularly the right to adequate food. 

Global hunger…

...is not a problem of scarce resources. Enough food is produced to feed the world. Nevertheless, the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations estimates that more than 850 million people in the world suffer from hunger and malnutrition. Only a small percentage can be attributed to natural catastrophes or civil wars. The vast majority suffer from chronic hunger in everyday life.

“Every five seconds one child under the age of 5 dies from hunger or malnutrition-related disease. Every four minutes, one person loses his or her eyesight for lack of vitamin A. More than 852 million people do not get enough food each day to sustain a normal life. This is a shame on humanity. It is time to enforce the right to food.” - Jean Ziegler, Former UN-Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food:

The situation is a paradox...

...because although the urban hungry constitute the fastest growing group, most of the world’s hungry still live in the rural areas - where most food is produced! Hunger affects small peasants more than other groups. Many of them live in remote and mountainous areas, threatened by drought, floods or mud slides. Landless people try to survive with income obtained working under precarious conditions as agricultural labourers. Fisherfolk,  hunters and herders are also marginalised. Women and girls are particularly affected by hunger and malnutrition.

Hunger and malnutrition...

..are deeply entrenched in groups that are socially, politically and geographically marginalized and discriminated against. The role of governments is important in creating and securing access to productive resources like land, seeds and water and to social transfers like minimum income programmes. States have binding obligations to protect, respect and fulfil the right to food in their territories and worldwide. Many states, however, lack the political will to meet these obligations. Social movements and non-governmental organizations hold states accountable for violations of the right to food.